Burpees for Boobies

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So it’s CrossFit competition season here in South Texas – a lot of the big competitions (besides Fittest Games) here in the San Antonio area are coming up in the next few months and it’s pretty awesome to see people at my box getting into competitions who have never tried it before.  Me and a few friends have signed up for Burpees for Boobies in Austin since the mega-popular team competition Duality here in San Antonio sold out in (seriously) two minutes.  So I’ve been upping my CrossFit game a bit (and because of previously posted-about running “break”) – they’ve released the first three workouts (with the final TBA) which has given us a good idea of what we need to work on:

 

Workout 1

40 Wall balls (20/14)

21-15-9
Power cleans(65/95)
12-9-6
T2B

25 burpee buy out

 

Workout 2

2 RM Front Squat
7 Min Cap with as many attempts as need within the time frame

 

Workout 3

9 Min AMRAP
Buy in with 3 laps around main mall with Kettlebell (estimate 250-300m per lap)
Then as many reps as possible of
-10 Single arm Kettlebell G2O (20 Kg/16 Kg)
-30 Double unders

 

So the areas of The Suck here are (in order of suckiness for me):

  1. Toes-to-bar
  2. 3 laps w/kettlebell (awkward weight much?)
  3. Wall balls

 

65 pound power cleans and 35 pound ground-to-overhead are easy money for me, which means I would need to absolutely slaughter these events to have any chance at doing well at this competition.  Not really sure what kind of participation this event will have, so I have no clue as to the level of competition I’ll have here (but you can always count on a few people in the scaled division who should be competing Rx…)

 

t2b

 

So, this is my own personal kryptonite.  I hate them.  I’m heavy.  They’re hard.  What the hell is that guy’s feet doing in the second part of that image.  So many complaints.  I’ve never been able to string together t2b – I’ve always had to do one, stop, reset, do another, stop, reset, do another, etc.  So I’ve been working on it.  Yesterday one of the guys at my box instructed me to “push away from the bar when coming up” which helps the swing back down progress back into another rep.  I gave him what I thought was a skeptical look – it was during the WOD, so it was probably more like a “I’m dying right now” look – and went back to my crappy planking before I had another round of T2B to do.  Then I hopped on the bar and did five in a row.  It was like freaking magic.  My hands were and still are pissed off, but that shit happened and even though nobody saw it, IT HAPPENED.

 

So there’s that.  I seriously need to work more on them, because I want to be able to do all the t2b unbroken at the competition (so 12 at least) since doing the power cleans at 65 pounds will be easy.  So the goal for right now is to try and bring my front squat 2 rep max up as high as possible (I’m at a 185 1 rep right now, not sure about 2 rep) and to kill the wall balls and t2b.  I also need to figure out what the most efficient way to carry a kettlebell during a run is.  (Crap…)

 

This was mostly a bit of a ramble.  Today’s training fun:

Strength/Skill:
1 Arm Alternating Kettlebell Swings
3 x 12 (35#, 44#, 53#)

WOD:
10′ AMRAP
5 x Power Clean (110#)
5 x Handstand Push Ups (used ab-mat)
20 x Double Unders
Score: 7 Rounds + 5 PC

Also I kipped my first HSPUs today.  BOOM.

t2bgosling
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Sticky rice and handstands

So, I’ve re-entered the wild and wonderful world of CrossFit competition training.  Which is always a wise thing to do when you’re training for about one million running races.  Since The Unfortunate Incident of the Runner in the Night (please read this book if you have not), me and running have been kind of “on a break”.  (It’s not you…it’s me.)  I’ve had a few things nagging me knee and hip-wise and my work schedule has changed approximately a metric shit-ton in the last three weeks or so, which has totally ruined my ability to sleep or function with any kind of reliability.  Tomorrow I have to go in to work for a training on “Operational Stress Control” (hilarious!) – on my day off at 1000 when I would otherwise be running, jumping, climbing trees or whatever.  Coming in for Navy training on my day off makes my levels of “operational stress” jump off the charts.  Luckily for my stress levels, I go back to night shift semi-permanently (at least a month?) which means I can hopefully get back to running somewhat steadily.

In general I find CrossFit to be about 97% less stressful to me than running.  Most people would probably find this kind of weird considering the wonky and cultish culture of foaming-at-the-mouth competitiveness CrossFit seems to have the reputation for these days (I’ll let you in on a secret: just because you read something on the internet does not mean it’s true).  It’s probably because I feel like I’m generally better at CrossFit than running (looking at me this is no surprise – I’m a little hefty to be a runner but can pick stuff up like a champ!) so I’m less stressed due to a generally increased confidence level.  I still love running, but sometimes I get a bit neurotic about paces and this and that.  It’s bizarre how I can go to CrossFit and fail a lift and shrug it off as “just not my day” but if I run below a certain pace I get all ornery and beat myself up about it.  I don’t really like to get all neurotic about running, so hence the break.

I didn’t stop running for two weeks, but I definitely just ran slightly leisurely…and without the watch.  There is no such thing as a break from running where I still wear the Garmin.  Not ever ever.  I’m sure all this leisurely running isn’t doing wonders for my future marathon, but it’s not like I’m BQ’ing or anything anyways – with birthday cake and Nutella at the aid stations we should all probably just forget about any dreams of elite speeds occurring at this race.  I still want to do my best, so don’t be mistaken about that.  It was more important to me to get my brain and body right for the future.  I did this a few different ways:

  1. Picked up heavy shit.
  2. Put it down.
  3. Foam rolled like it was my freaking job.
  4. Worked on hip and ankle mobility like it was my freaking job.
  5. Went shit-nuts seeing my favorite band live:
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Highlights include: Greg grabbed and held my hand tree times. I’m kind of a big deal now. He gave me the mic to let me sing (scream) into the mic twice. I crowd-surfed twice and lost my shoes. Ben almost gave me a concussion.

 

Among other things, most of which involved chocolate.  And today, Thai sticky rice with mango.  If you have not had this amazing Thai dessert, please put your pants on immediately and head to your local Thai place to consume this heavenly dessert ahora mismo.  It’s just plain good for your soul.

 

Anyways, so CrossFit has eaten my life for the past few weeks, as I mentioned.  The past three weeks have almost literally been:  wake up, eat (maybe), work, work overtime (that’s not a real thing in the military), go home, change, CrossFit, eat, sleep, repeat.  Working day shift has been totally consuming my time, mostly because when I get put in to sub for other people on day shift they sub me for about three people.  Which means I end up doing the majority of things that need to be done – including juggling three clueless trainees –  while my team lead walks around looking important.  Which is okay.  But it’s time-consuming.   I often stay way later than I should.  Unlike CrossFit (which takes less than an hour on a good day), running 10-14 miles has been difficult to fit into the afternoon schedule.

 

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Beyond the Whiteboard – like Training Peaks, but for CrossFitters.

So that’s the story.  Lots of CrossFit and less running makes a 185 pound front squat PR (booyah!) but not really a 60k night race PR, but my operational stress brain is a little better off for it.  (I needed a win, guys…give me a break.)  I have a race in a few weeks (30k) but I’m not too worried.  I’m going to run hard and try to have fun.  My marathon is in thirty days, but I’m at peace with that.  There have been times I could have been running and instead I was passed out on the carpet in a pile of Kill Cliff cans (the intervention is nigh), but I have made my peace with that too.  The more I fret, the less enjoyable running becomes.  However, I’m still back to the schedule next week – just with less stressing.  Hopefully the pace goals will come with time.  Hopefully Cactus Rose comes and I’m not still retching with fear at the thought of fifty miles at Bandera.

We’ll see, I guess.  In the meantime, sticky rice and sweet tea.

CrossFit and Spartan

It’s finally CrossFit Games time!!

bridges

Anyways.  Any of you people who actually follow CrossFit in the slightest know that I am dreaming big in rooting for Josh Bridges pretty much every year.  I’m pretty sure Rich Froning was manufactured in a CrossFit lab somewhere to win the Games every year without even appearing to try.  But I have to root for my Shipmate.

Anyways.

So tomorrow I’m free on running, so I think I’m going to take the day for Spartan training instead of resting.  Since I run enough and CrossFit plenty, I figure the biggest thing I’m lacking in my training for the upcoming HH12HR  is carrying awkward heavy stuff around.  In the first 12HR in Vegas, athletes were told to take a tire and run the course, keeping in mind that there was a cutoff to be back to the finish line.  This is probably going to be my biggest weakness at the race.  (Technically, the Spartan Hurricane Heat isn’t a “race” per se, but for the purposes of this blog I’m going to continue to call it that.)

 

 

I have a particularly gnarly memory from last year where I competed in a CrossFit-style competition the YMCA put on in conjunction with Team RWB (the super awesome non-profit I am a part of, if you haven’t been paying attention).  One of the events was a sandbag run of about 400m and I can still remember that I was basically ready to give up on life about halfway through.  I finished last in my group (only a group of four, but still) and was completely discouraged.  Something about carrying that awkward weight while running just kills me every time.  AMRAP with a 200m run carrying a wall-ball?  Terrible memories of that one too.

 

So the plan for tomorrow is to take the sandbag to the trails and just get comfortable with it.  I’ll probably take it to the hills at a local park and do some hiking.  Then I’ll head to CrossFit, where tomorrow’s WOD is as follows:

 
Strength/Skill:
Single Arm Kettlebell press
3 x 6 each arm
 
WOD:
10′ AMRAP
10 x Deadlifts
10 x Push Ups
30 x Double Unders
 
Should be a fun one.  Back to the subject of balance from yesterday, I’m gonna play it by ear with this extra Spartan training in conjunction with marathon training + CrossFit.  I don’t want to get too cocky and think that I don’t need to do much else, but I don’t want to end up dealing with overtraining issues.  So I’m just going to work it in when I can, and more importantly when I feel good.  We’ll see what happens.

Blog-narok, Heat, and Motivation

Blogging is hard.

 

Well, blogging regularly is hard.  My coach and I have challenged each other to a 30-day blogging type of deal.  (Visit her blog, it’s way funnier than mine and also her adorable baby girl is prominently featured.)  It’s been a while since I’ve written here.  I’m pretty good at the stop-and-start of writing, but not so much the styling and finalizing.  I was terrible at writing the “conclusion” paragraph in our neat little MLA-styled essays in school – knowing ahead of time that I was bad at writing that part made it hard to even start.  I’ve also been in a bit of a running funk for a little while, which has made for some pretty uninteresting blogging.  (Read: grumpy blogs are not okay.)

 

Turns out it gets pretty hot in Texas during the summer, so suddenly all that good training I felt like I was doing turned into a series of epic bitchfests in which I felt like I was Usain Bolt but was really running eleven minute miles (really, if I was lucky).  Going for a casual run transformed into this huge endeavor of planning just the right time to go outside without instantaneously melting, loaded down with water and Tailwind like some weird Texas version of an Everest sherpa.  What was once easy (logistically) became harder than I expected, and with what seemed like very little payoff.

 

I didn’t really train a whole lot last summer.  Or at least, I wasn’t training for anything in particular – I was running when I felt like it, and not running particularly long.  I was mostly just running for general fitness, weight loss, and to keep up my score on the Navy PT test (I finally obtained my long-time goal of scoring an “outstanding” on the run portion that cycle).  It was easy.  I didn’t start “training” until around late October or November (can’t remember exactly) when I decided to sign up for Nueces as my first 50k and took on a most wonderful coach.

 

Having a coach really changed running for me.  I felt accountable to someone else at that point, and was definitely running the most organized and serious running plan I had ever done as a runner.  I had Nueces as my goal and I was seeing improvement all the time.  In a way, training back then felt different.  I’ve asked myself several times lately if maybe the motivation just isn’t there and that’s why a lot of running has seemed like suffering lately.  It’s hard to feel motivated when you don’t feel like you’re improving because the weather just turns everything on its head.  I’ve never been competitive with anyone but myself, so when I start to feel like I can’t even compete with myself, I get a bit discouraged.  Nueces went by, then Brazos Bend went by, and there was a bit of a lull there where I wasn’t really training for anything in particular.  The idea of doing Cactus Rose 50 miler was kicked around, but even to this day I still haven’t registered.

 

50 miles?  Me?  That’s insane.  If I went outside right now and started running (it’s 1135) I’d get barely a handful of miles and feel like I wanted to die, easily.  All the poor performance really filled me with self-doubt that really kind of kept me from committing to anything.  Even though the weather has been my major source of ire lately, the piss-poor attitude that it brought along with it was really the biggest cause of my suffering.  (But also the heat and humidity.  They’re not getting off scott-free while I’m around.)  I’m sure you’ve seen all the inspiring quotes about pain being inevitable but suffering being optional.  I was doing a lot of lingering on my decreased performance and suffering because I was stuck there in that attitude for a long time (well, like a month or two).

 

Weirdly, I really feel like what grabbed me and pulled me out of this rut was CrossFit.  I was in a kind of bad place at this point; skipping a lot of runs/workouts, doing a lot more sitting around, eating a lot more ice cream, feeling fat and out-of-shape because I was on the verge of puking/collapsing every time I went outside and ran for more than three seconds.  Not really a great place to be.  Going back to CrossFit regularly helped me get back into a routine and kind of made me realize…hey, I’m not a completely useless limp noodle.  I think it’s impossible for anyone to deadlift 305 pounds (new PR, whoop whoop) and then go “Damn, I’m so out of shape.”  I guess it turns out I’m alright at CrossFit – I mean, I’m also bad at a lot of it (toes-to-bar!), but still – and am not out of shape in the slightest.

 

So I guess this blog post is mostly an explanation of where I’ve been, and what I’ve been doing.  Not really full of any major insight.  Still not running super fast, but I’m getting better (despite everything).

(Dude I’m going to be so fast when it gets cold again.)

I’ve got some goals to keep me going. (60 days until the marathon.)  Mostly I’m just trying to enjoy what I’m doing.  Suffering is optional.

Thinking Out Loud Thursday

Thinking-Out-Loud

 

1.  First, can we talk about how Liza Howard is amazing:

Six months post-partum (so six months of sleep deprivation, plus three ten minute breaks to breast pump during the race), crushing the female record at Umstead 100 in 15:07.  Truly an inspiration to us all!  For further proof please see this What Is Ultra post about her.

 

2.  Buzzfeed posted an article called  75 Thoughts Every Runner Has While Out For A Run a few days ago, and I’m pretty sure during all the very unsightly guffawing I was relating to almost everything on the list:

buzzrun

Most people have probably already seen this, but I need to note this here just in case there’s one poor unfortunate soul out there who hasn’t happened upon this already.  And while we’re talking about hilarious things:

THIS.

“100 miles? I don’t even like to drive that far.”
“Your mom doesn’t like to drive that far.”

#zerolimits

I’ve never ran 100 miles, but I’ve received this clever (not) little line for just doing half marathons, 25ks or 50ks before, so.  PSA to all you out there: NOT FUNNY.  Also I was torn between pride and embarrassment at how much some of these things resonate with me.  Especially the shoe thing.  …so many shoes.

 

3.  WHY CAN’T I RUN A HUNDRED MILES.

 

4.  On a more serious note, there’s this, a photo project by @DearWorld that admittedly had me a little teary eyed.

DEAR SURVIVORS,

When we asked you to return to the finish line, a place that changed your lives, we knew it wouldn’t be easy. You told us some days are harder than others, but that it’s okay to have bad days.

Mostly you told us about the goodness of others. Colleagues who babysat. School kids who sent notes. Neighbors who cooked dinner.

What happened that day was terror. Terror happens when love is absent.

Boston is a city of love stories now.

Thank you for sharing yours here. As you heal, know you inspire the rest of us to be better, still.

Love,

Robert
Founder, Dear World

 

I think it is incredibly important when tragedies like this occur that we highlight the survivors and wonderful people who were there to help others who were suffering.  This is an beautiful example of how to move on when something irreparably terrible happens around you, and if you have even just one moment to spare I would suggest you check it out.  🙂

 

5.  I went back to CrossFit for the first time in almost two months on Monday, and MY BODY IS STILL BROKEN.  Well, not completely, but it’s been quite a long time that I’ve felt so sore.  I tried to run today and still felt a bit off.  The WOD we did was 3 rounds of 5 body weight deadlifts, 25 box jumps, and 10 pull-ups.  Now, the box jumps and deadlifts I can probably get away with a little bit of stiffness for a couple of days, a bit of tired legs, whatever – I’ve been running the whole time I’ve not been doing CrossFit, so those weren’t really a big deal.  I have NOT however been doing upper body, so the short story here is that lifting my arms went from laughably easy pre-WOD to an impossibly post-WOD (the day after) and then to a very uncomfortable chore within the last few days.  So, that’s a thing.  #crossfitkills

 

6.  I really need to get back into cross-training before my body breaks FOR REAL.  Hence the CrossFit.  I even bought a Groupon for 20 yoga classes.  I went to yoga and am not ashamed to say I bitched for like ten minutes after (jokingly, more or less – but still) because yoga is freaking HARD.  Ugh.  I’ve been trolling r/yoga a lot lately, and if that one yoga class I took last week wasn’t proof enough of my distinct lack of flexibility in certain places, seeing something like this makes me feel like an inflexible stone:

twisty

What is this I don’t even.

I’m not even sure what to think of things like this.  What are you, Gumby?!  Meanwhile I can’t even get my heels to the ground in down dog.  Damn.

 

7.  (I had to check to see what number I was on.  Probably a sign this is going too far.)  So I’ve been pretty good at avoiding overpriced workout clothes lately, but today the local lululemon store posted this adorable tank on their FB page, and it’s got my jimmies all rustled.

lulutank

 

This is getting long and soon it won’t even be Thursday anymore.  So I leave you with, number 8:

 

8.)

I think this speaks for itself.

I think this speaks for itself.

Thinking Out Loud Thursday

So, I’m jumping on the bandwagon for Thinking Out Loud Thursdays, brought to you by the fine blogger Amanda over at Running with Spoons.

Thinking-Out-Loud

    1. Am I the only one who spends totally inordinate amounts of time trolling the internet for awesome races?  I recently discovered the Squamish 50 miler while browsing UltraSignup and have been obsessed with it ever since, especially since they frequently post beautiful images of the trails:squamishDisgustingly beautiful!  I thought I would luck out and it would be in Canada near to where one of my best friends back home is moving to (Toronto I believe), but Squamish is near Vancouver, so uh totally off.  But I’ll get there one day anyways, because this race looks completely beautifully amazing.
    2. Speaking of awesome races I want to do, this one is coming up:
      ultracbI know since Born to Run came out, everyone and their mother probably says they want to do this race, but I seriously want to do this race.  I spoke with a girl at the Fuego y Agua Hunter Gatherer race last year who went down and did it with her boyfriend and it sounds like a totally rad and amazing time.
    3. I’m running the Bandera 25k this weekend and I am completely terrified.  I had a miserable time last year, and I’m determined to make it better this year.  And by miserable I don’t mean “holy shit this is freaking hard why would I do something so hard” but more like “EVERYTHING THAT COULD GO WRONG HAS INDEED GONE WRONG” which is always followed by sadness.

      This is Bandera in one picture.  ROCKS.  And looming at the top, the sotol.

      This is Bandera in one picture. ROCKS. And looming at the top, the sotol.

    4. Can we talk about how cool the Ragnar Trail Relay is?  It’s like all the fun parts of the Texas Independence Relay or Capital to Coast without all the…uh…roads.  I’ll probably talk more about this later.
    5. It’s warming up outside, which is good in a way because it was fourteen freaking degrees on Monday morning (shut up, Northerners) but  bad because I will no longer be able to justify drinking hot chocolate.  /singleteardrop
    6. My dog is creepily staring at me as I write this blog post.

      chloecreep

      …or as I check Facebook. Whatever.

    7. Registration for the CrossFit Open is next week!  I can’t believe it’s that time again.  I’m excited.  I will continue to be excited until the first Open WOD with muscle-ups, then I will become suddenly disinterested and sad I still cannot do muscle-ups.
    8. I’m feeling pretty peer pressured into posting a 2014 Goals post.
    9. Meghann at The Life and Fork needs to make it her 2014 Goal to tell me how to make the allegedly amazing butternut squash bread she made the other day…or else.
    10. I think the fact that I made it to number ten on this post means I’ve gone too far.

Team RWB Trail Running Camp (Part Two)

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Saturday and Sunday brought a whole slew of amazing experiences!

Our first run was at 0700 but coffee was being served at 0615, so my plans of sleeping in a bit were shattered by all the stirring coffee-drinkers at 0600.  I dressed and walked down to the pavilion to chit-chat, where I ended up learning that coming between a trail runner and their coffee is a big fat no-no, as the coffee was still brewing and a mob of coffee-fiending runners was beginning to gather ominously around the brewing pots.

Glad I don’t drink coffee.

Eventually we all gathered in our respective pace groups to head out on the first of many “Focused Running Workouts” – runs where we would receive an on-the-go seminar of sorts from one of the various trail running mentors who were in charge of leading our group.  We learned a bit about trail running form on this one, namely picking up your feet and mostly some general running form that transfers over to trails.  For me personally, being instructed to focus on “quick, light feet” has always been something that has helped me immensely – it’s so easy after long distances to start plodding along.  High cadence, light feet, quick over the rocks.  Easier said than done sometimes, but it helps me out from time to time to remember that.

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Though I learned a lot of new things from the various running workout/seminars, the best part about the runs was easily Camp Eagle’s awesome terrain.  The trails are beautiful but difficult, and once you get done cursing those steep and seemingly never-ending climbs, you’re rewarded with some of the most amazing views.  We did a “Downhill Running Technique” and a “Speed Intervals” workout (two separate seminars, but we sort of combined them since they were in the same trip) later in the day that had us running repeats on a pretty steep hill 3-4 times.  Hills are easily my biggest weakness with trail running, so this was a bit of a tough time for me.  It sounds like a cliche to say the views made it all worth it, but I don’t care because they did!  It also gave me an excuse to stop at the top and be all “reflective” and whatnot (aka, catch my breath because those hills are intense!)

Nikki Kimball speaking to an enthralled crowd

Nikki Kimball speaking to an enthralled crowd

After dinner, we were treated to an amazing presentation by an amazing keynote speaker:  Nikki Kimball, three-time Western States 100 mile champion and a seriously all-around epic woman.  Nikki spoke of her struggles with depression as well as her attempt to beat the record for Vermont’s 273-mile Long Trail.  In addition to running and beating the record, she was also trying to raise funds and awareness for the organization Girls on the Run, an awesome non-profit geared towards encouraging young girls to pursue active lifestyles through running.  I’ve volunteered with GotR before and they’re an amazing organization, and it was so awesome to hear that extraordinary women like Nikki are out there supporting them.  

 

Nikki cited the pervasive problem of women being unrecognized in sports as one of her inspirations to beat the record – the women’s record at the time was seven days, while the men’s record that Nikki was shooting to beat was four and a half.  She mentioned when winning Western States, how the male’s race was front page news while her win was barely even a footnote.  As a woman, hearing how Nikki overcame crippling depression to break records and run insane distances was incredibly important for me.  People like Nikki are important to showcasing how powerful and competitive women can be in sports…I really admired her honesty and her strength in describing her struggles, as well as her will to blaze the trail for women aspiring to great things in her wake.

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The next day we started our morning with “Technical Trail Running Skills” – this was easily the most fun I had running the entire camp.  The first half of the run was a challenging uphill, but then the second half was all technical (slight) downhill, switchbacks and crazy speed!  I ran up front with some of the elites, and felt like a little bit of a big deal chit-chatting with them while we sped down the trail (probably infinitely slower than they ever normally run, but I’ll take it haha).

Highlight of this day though, was definitely the presentation by Mike Ehredt.

If you have three minutes (if you’re reading this, you have three minutes!) WATCH THIS.  Mike ran across America TWICE (from Oregon to Maine and then Minnesota to Texas) to commemorate all the military members who died in Iraq and Afghanistan.  He stopped every mile to plant a flag in memory of a specific soldier’s death.  Hearing him speak was completely amazing.  Mike is truly a testament to how one normal guy can do something completely extraordinary when his heart is really in it.

Later that day we did a 5k obstacle course.  After doing this, I really wish Camp Eagle would put something on like this more often!  As I’ve mentioned, the terrain is really gnarly and perfect for this kind of stuff – as someone obsessed with Spartan Race and things of that sort, coming out to Camp Eagle for an actual obstacle race would be loads of fun.  The course itself wasn’t especially challenging (except the ring crossing!  ugh!) but it was loads of fun, which was just what I was looking for.  I was feeling pretty tired by this point, so when my friend said he was going to pass on the obstacle course I almost bowed out with him.  I think Jason Bryant’s enthusiasm at the start really pumped me up to go out and have fun and not worry about my stupid legs and their stupid tiredness.  (I don’t know why they insist on getting like that…sheesh.)  By the time I returned, I was feeling pretty beat.  We had dinner and I contemplated retiring to bed, but decided to join everyone around the camp fire and socialized with some cool new people over beers.

Monday definitely started out differently, as instead of running we did WOD for Warriors.  WOD for Warriors is a CrossFit workout Team RWB does on Veteran’s and Memorial Day – for Veteran’s Day it was as follows:

9 minute AMRAP

100-meter sprint

11 sit-ups

11 air squats

100-meter sprint

22 sit-ups

22 air squats

100-meter sprint

33 sit-ups

33 air squats

 

add 11 to the sit-ups and air squats for each additional round

 

2-minute rest and reflection

then

 

9 minute AMRAP

100-meter sprint

11 pushups

11 box jumps (RX 24”/20”)

100-meter sprint

22 pushups

22 box jumps (RX 24”/20”)

100-meter sprint

33 pushups

33 box jumps (RX 24”/20”)

We did jumping lunges instead of box jumps.  It was really fun and a blast to get “back in my element” of CrossFit after spending the whole weekend being a back of the pack runner, haha.  I love trail running, but I’m no Nikki Kimball!  It was fun to talk and workout with the runners there who had never done CrossFit before.

After breakfast and the last RWB Leadership seminar, we took our leave of Camp Eagle.  I met a lot of awesome, inspiring, amazing people!  So much passion for trail running and Team RWB that it makes me smile just typing this.  I really hope that I am fortunate enough to return next year, as this was truly one of the greatest experiences I’ve ever had.  A big huge thanks goes out to Liza Howard, Joe and Joyce Prusaitis, all the volunteers and mentors, and most definitely TEAM RWB for allowing this amazing experience to happen!

 

Leaving Camp Eagle, all smiles!

Leaving Camp Eagle, all smiles!